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News, events, updates, and tidbits from the Presbyterian Historical Society. Use tags to read related articles or sort by author for similar posts written by PHS staff members and volunteers.

June 11, 2018

We've just published in Pearl's Oral Histories Collection a 1981-1982 interview of Presbyterian civil rights worker Gayraud Wilmore, conducted at Newark Airport and in Rochester, New York by PHS advisory council member and Wilmore's colleague, J. Oscar McCloud.

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June 7, 2018

On December 26th 1965, Duke Ellington took the stage at the Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church in New York City for a performance of what he would call the most important work he had ever done. That day he performed one of his three “Sacred Concerts.” These concerts were written in the later stages of his life as he found himself grappling with his own mortality and relationship to God. The Presbyterian Historical Society is fortunate to hold within our collections a program from that historic night....

May 24, 2018

--by Ginny Rainey

Presbyterians affirm in the Great Ends of the Church the promotion of social righteousness. As the denomination gathers in St. Louis for its 223rd General Assembly, Stated Clerk, J. Herbert Nelson says, “We don’t want the Presbyterians to be simply another convention that comes to town, meets and spends some money, and then leaves without engaging the people and communities....Presbyterians don’t depart the world to come to the General Assembly, we come to the General Assembly precisely and specifically to engage the church AND...

February 27, 2018

As African American History Month draws to a close, we are thrilled to announce the completion of an almost two-year effort to digitize and share more of the society’s African American history collections. This project was generously funded by a PHS donor and includes a variety of content--archival collections, photographs, video, and a periodical--that is now part of our online archives, Pearl.

The meaning...
February 16, 2018

One of the first things you learn when studying the “Civil Rights Movement” is that calling it the “Civil Rights Movement” is a bit of a misnomer. There was not a single movement, just as there was not a single leader. The multiple civil rights movements that evolved independently and yet concurrently during the 1950s and '60s were led by men and women who shared a common belief in equality and social justice.

As historians move beyond the narrative of a single story we begin to encounter new stories and new truths. Reverend Cecil Augustus Ivory is a name...

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