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News, events, updates, and tidbits from the Presbyterian Historical Society. Use tags to read related articles or sort by author for similar posts written PHS staff members.

April 18, 2016

PHS has recently brought online six motion pictures of the African American Presbyterian experience, thanks to the generosity of an anonymous donor. Among them, is a speech by UPCUSA Moderator Edler G. Hawkins, which was presented at General Assembly in 1964. In it, Hawkins calls Christian silence amid the struggle for human rights a form of terror: "What the mood of the Negro is saying now almost sixty years after his early terror -- as it happens again in Birmingham, New York, Chicago, or any place -- is that for the church not to speak, and not to act leaves a silence that is terror to...

April 18, 2016

Three hundred years before the Protestant Reformation, and one hundred and fifty years before Jan Hus, there were the Waldensians, a group of European Believers whose radical theological tenets would later be adopted in many parts of Christendom.

This year, the American Waldensian Society (AWS) celebrates its 110th anniversary. Founded in 1906 in New York City as the American Waldensian Aid Society, the society...

April 13, 2016

The Presbyterian Historical Society documents the experiences of Presbyterians from across the country. As part of our series on regional histories, here are five stories about the Atlanta area collected by PHS.

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Before it was Atlanta, it was Marthasville. Before that, it was Terminus and Standing Peachtree...

March 31, 2016

Between 1932 and 1940, the work of foreign missionaries in China became entangled with the internal revolutionary struggles of the nation and the military aspirations of Imperial Japan. These were pivotal years for both China and the missionary effort. By the end of the period, most western missionaries, including Rev. Lacy Moffett and his family, were faced with a soul-searching dilemma: to continue their life’s work in the face of political turmoil and physical danger, or to return to the United States.

A Brief History of Presbyterian Missions in China ...

March 16, 2016

In post-Gold Rush California, San Francisco’s Chinatown was ruled by tongs—secret associations of Chinese men who originally banded together to defend themselves against the xenophobia of the West but devolved into warring gangs in a violent underworld of human and drug trafficking. In this terrifying landscape, a young Scottish missionary from New Zealand managed to infiltrate the Chinese underworld to save more than 3,000 women and children from slavery. To the tongs she was known as Fahn Quai, the White Devil; to those she saved she was Lo Mo, Beloved...

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